IS MODIFYING THE IMPACT OF EVENINGNESS CHRONOTYPE IN ADOLESCENCE A PATHWAY TO IMPROVED HEALTH?

All Authors:
Lu Dong, University of California, Berkeley , Berkeley, California, United States (Primary Presenter); Nicole B Gumport, University of California Berkeley , Berkeley, United States; Armando J Martinez, University of California Berkeley , Berkeley, United States; Allison Harvey, University of California Berkeley , Berkeley, United States

This talk will present empirical evidence suggesting that improvements in sleep and circadian problems mediate the effect of a novel transdiagnostic sleep and circadian intervention (TranS-C) on health outcomes in five domains (emotional, cognitive, behavioral, social, and physical) in community-residing, evening chronotype adolescents who were at risk for problems in these five health domains. Participants were 176 adolescents (age mean [SD] = 14.77 [1.84] years; 58% female), who were randomized to receive 6-sessions of TranS-C or psychoeducation (PE). Putative mediators tested were eveningness, weekday-weekend discrepancy in total sleep time and waketime, daytime sleepiness, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, and parent-reported sleep-wake problems. Risk in five health domains was measured using adolescent self-reported questionnaires, parent-reported Child Behavior Checklist, and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of problems in the five health domains. Improvement in eveningness mediated the effects of TranS-C on reducing both self-reported and parent-reported risk in the five health domains. Reduction in daytime sleepiness mediated the effects of TranS-C on parent-reported risk in the five health domains. Reduction in parent-reported sleep-wake problems mediated the effects of TranS-C on self-reported, parent-reported, and EMA-assessed risk in the five health domains. Results did not support the other hypothesized mediators. TranS-C exerts effects on reducing risk in multiple mental and physical health domains through improving sleep and circadian problems in evening chronotype adolescents. Further research of TranS-C in other samples to assess its benefits for sleep and circadian problems as well as mental and physical health is warranted.