SACKLER SYMPOSIUM: FROM ANIMALS TO HUMANS: UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF MATERNAL IMMUNE ACTIVATION ON THE DEVELOPING OFFSPRING BRAIN AND ASSOCIATED BEHAVIORS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

Symposium Co-Chairs: Dustin Scheinost, Yale University, New Haven, USA and Marisa N. Spann, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, New York, USA

Presenters:

  • Sarah E. Canetta, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, New York, USA
  • Carina L. Block, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA
  • Jerod M. Rasmussen, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, USA
  • Dustin Scheinost, Yale University, New Haven, USA
  • Marisa N. Spann discussant, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, New York, USA

Maternal immune activation (MIA)‚Äîactivation of the innate and adaptive immune system following infection, stress, poor physical health, and inflammation‚Äîis a common and consequential environmental insult on the developing brain. Preclinical animal models and large-scale epidemiological studies have established some proximal and long lasting effects of MIA on offspring. Particularly, previous studies have highlighted the role of MIA in altering brain early brain development and increasing risk of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. In contrast, translational human studies are only just beginning to consider MIA in association with offspring brain and behavioral changes. The goal of this symposium is to present cutting-edge research on the role of MIA in shaping the developing cortex, particularly in prefrontal and limbic brain regions, using both preclinical animal and translations human neonatal studies. The studies are complementary in highlighting changes in brain connectivity at the cellular, circuit, and physiological levels‚Äîessentially providing mechanistic and translational evidence of MIA’s role in preceding neuropsychiatric disorders. Each study presents the behavioral phenotypes associated with the brain alterations, such as cognitive flexibility and social deficits that are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Consistent with the preclinical model, the emerging translational human studies demonstrate that MIA is associated with alterations in regions of frontal and limbic cortices linked to developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The presenters and discussant have complementary expertise in the field of developmental neuroscience ranging from preclinical, epidemiological, and translational human research of MIA. Together, they will clarify the primary brain and behavioral consequences associated with MIA.

Presentation 1: MATERNAL IMMUNE ACTIVATION ORIGINS OF ADULT PREFRONTAL CORTICAL PARVALBUMIN INTERNEURON FUNCTIONAL DYSCONNECTIVITY. S.E. Canetta, E. Teboul, A.S. Brown & C. Kellendonk ABSTRACT

Presentation 2: PRENATAL AIR POLLUTION AND MATERNAL STRESS ALTER BRAIN DEVELOPMENT IN THE ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX. C.L. Block, O. Eroglu, S.D. Mague, C.J. Smith, K. Dzirasa, S. D. Bilbo and C. Eroglu ABSTRACT

Presentation 3: MATERNAL INTERLEUKIN-6 CONCENTRATION DURING PREGNANCY IS ASSOCIATED WITH VARIATION IN FRONTOLIMBIC WHITE MATTER AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY LIFE. J.M. Rasmussen, A.M. Graham, S. Entringer, J.H. Gilmore, M. Styner, D.A. Fair, P.D. Wadhwa, C. Buss ABSTRACT

Presentation 4: A TALE OF TWO IMMUNE MARKERS: MATERNAL IMMUNE ACTIVATION DURING THE 3RD TRIMESTER IS ASSOCIATED WITH NEONATAL FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY AND FETAL TO TODDLER BEHAVIOR. D Scheinost, M.N. Spann, C.E. Monk, B.S. Peterson ABSTRACT